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Microvolunteer

Microvolunteering: the benefits and drawbacks

National Volunteer Weekvolunteer-lethbridge is right around the corner. Communities across the country are celebrating volunteerism during April 10-16th , inspiring people and thanking volunteers for their invaluable contributions.

As part of their National Volunteer Week Celebrations, Volunteer Lethbridge is promoting Microvolunteering Day on Friday, April 15th.

From the Microvolunteering Day website:

“Microvolunteering is bite-sized, on-demand, no commitment actions that benefit a worthy cause.”

Some examples of microvolunteering include:

  • Tweeting about an organization or event
  • Baking a cake, knitting a hat, or writing a card for a cause
  • Picking up garbage in your community
  • Participating in a survey or research project
  • Signing a petition
  • Helping a senior with their groceries or yard work

I talked to Chelsea Sherbut, Volunteer Lethbridge’s Development Coordinator, to learn more about microvolunteering and what Volunteer Lethbridge has planned for the day.

Sam Kriviak: How is microvolunteering different from traditional volunteering? What are the benefits and drawbacks of microvolunteering?

Chelsea Sherbut: Unlike most normal volunteer opportunities, there is no application process, no screening, and no real commitment with microvolunteering. Usually you don’t have to go to a specific place to do it. It can often be done for home on your own time. You can see that there can be a lot of benefits!

Some drawbacks are that volunteers might miss out on making some of the “real life” connections that you get with traditional volunteering, and it’s not the kind of volunteer opportunity that improves your résumé. It still can be tremendously impactful, though, and is a fantastic option for people who feel like they are too busy to volunteer.

SK: What about for volunteer-engaging organizations?

CS: For organizations, microvolunteering offers a way to create more engagement and an easy platform for people to get to know your organization better. It’s a good opportunity to expose people to your mission and slowly build an ambassador for your work!

iphone 4It can also be a lot easier to attract volunteers for these kind of opportunities. We often talk about eliminating barriers to volunteering and this is one great way. If you can create an opportunity that requires as few barriers as possible you’ve made it almost impossible for a prospective volunteer to say no!

Creating microvolunteering opportunities isn’t without challenges, but if you are creative, there are a lot of potential ways to use volunteers on a micro-scale: research and data collection, citizen science, online petitions, donations of specific items, brainstorming (i.e. naming your new exhibit/campaign), social media marketing, clean ups, etc.!

SK: Along with many other community celebrations, Volunteer Lethbridge is recognizing Microvolunteering Day as part of National Volunteer Week. What are your plans for the day?

CS: Yes we have a very busy week, so this one is a bit low key. Our main plans are:

  • to highlight a different microvolunteering opportunity each hour throughout the day on social media;
  • to complete some microvolunteering actions in our office.

SK: Why did you feel it was important to celebrate Microvolunteering Day? How does microvolunteering benefit Lethbridge?

CS: We want everyone in Lethbridge to consider themselves a volunteer. Microvolunteering is one super simple, super fast way to get involved that EVERYONE has time for. We’d also like to start building an awareness of how agencies can be creative when they are coming up with ways to engage more volunteers.

SK: If people are interested in microvolunteering, where can they go for more information or to get involved?

CS: For people outside of Lethbridge, check out the Microvolunteering Day website. In Lethbridge, check out our Facebook page on Friday, April 15th for a ton of great ideas and opportunities all day long! We would love to hear what micro-actions others in the province are doing too!


Thank you so much to Chelsea from Volunteer Lethbridge for sharing with us!

Do you have plans or ideas for Microvolunteering Day? Let us know in the comments! Places to find out more:

For more information on what else Lethbridge has planned for National Volunteer Week, and to browse other Alberta communities’ National Volunteer Week celebrations, visit our National Volunteer Week event page.

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What is Intrapreneurism? 6 lessons for adaptation, innovation, and leadership

Recently I had the privilege of being the moderator at a panel discussion on social leadership and intrapreneurism with intrapreneurs Carla Stolte, Ian Howat, and Pieter de Vos presented by IPAC Edmonton. It was an opportunity to gather with curious leaders who are interested in finding out more about what social leadership looks like and what intrapreneurship means.

From perspectives shared by the panelists, to questions asked by participants, the panel generated many useful lessons worth sharing.

Young teamSo what do social leadership and intrapreneurism mean?

  • Social Leaders are people who have the ability to bring people together, facilitate agreements, and drive efforts in the same direction.
  • Intrapreneurs are people within groups or organizations who are willing to take risks in an effort to innovate and solve important problems.

These are complementary skills that can be developed by many people. In fact, lots of people already work in these ways – they just don’t know it yet!

The six lessons I took away from the panel fall into two categories: individual and organizational.

LESSONS FOR INDIVIDUALS:

1. Discover for yourself that “I am enough.” This is more than a true statement – it’s a way of being, living your life, and working. Discovering that you are enough will allow you to see the opportunities in taking risks and sticking your neck out. From the place of “I am enough” you can build resiliency, commitment, and the ability to be invested in both your goals and the goals of others.

2. As intrapreneurs it is likely that you will face “no.” It’s important to take rejection as an opportunity to learn what others see as important so you can increase the likelihood of a “yes” the next time.

3. Intrapreneurs bring their whole selves to the table – all their identities, perspectives, experiences, and “ways of knowing.” Hobbies, interests, previous roles, community/volunteer work, and current roles are all resources that you can rely on to inform and advance ideas and projects.

LESSONS FOR ORGANIZATIONS:

4. Develop a tolerance for change. Intrapreneurism requires space inside of organizations to incubate ideas, generate buy-in, and communicate within the organization. Often we work in organizational cultures that are unnerved by small groups gathering to discuss “pet projects.” These movements should be encouraged because there is the potential for these conversations and projects to be the birth places of innovation and positive impact.

5. Create a framework for intrapreneurism. Organizations can create and implement frameworks for endorsing and encouraging intrapreneurism. This allows those who are not the intrapreneurs, but are often affected by intrapreneurs work, to understand how the approach fits into the strategic directions of the whole organization.

6. Support a “learning environment.” The space and opportunity to apply learning is often limited. A learning environment encourages people to explore new ideas and apply new skills and thinking to their work. New perspectives and ideas may disrupt the organization’s status quo; however, outcomes are likely to improve when learning is given space to grow and to thrive.

Ultimately, every organization has forces that vie for stability and status quo, as well as those that pull for change and adaptation. Professionals that are emerging intrapreneurs and social leaders can bridge this tension, resulting in increased capacity for innovation and impact.

For more information on intrapreneurism, check out www.leagueofintrapreneurs.com

Annand Ollivierre
Volunteer Alberta

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From the Vault: What DO Volunteers Want?

NVW2016_WebBanner editNational Volunteer Week is just around the corner! From April 10-16, join the country in recognizing and celebrating volunteerism in our communities. Learn more about National Volunteer Week and how to take part in the celebration.

In this blog, we share some volunteer recognition tips you can use during National Volunteer Week and year round.

Originally published November 12, 2013.

Volunteer Canada just released their 2013 Volunteer Recognition Study, and I highly recommend it to anyone who works with volunteers! It’s an easy and enlightening read. Best of all, there some big surprises that will (hopefully) improve how the sector works with and recognizes our volunteers.

To give you a taste, here are some of the biggest gaps the study identified between what our organizations think our volunteers want and what they truly appreciate:

1. In the study, volunteers said that their least preferred forms of recognition included formal gatherings (ex. banquets) and public acknowledgment (ex. radio ads or newspaper columns). These methods are common for many organizations, with 60% using banquets and formal gatherings, and 50% using public acknowledgement as their recognition strategies. Instead, volunteers indicated that they would prefer to be recognized through hearing about how their work has made a difference, and by being thanked in person on an ongoing, informal basis.

2. Over 80% of organizations said a lack of money was the most common barrier to volunteer recognition. Since the study shows that volunteers prefer personal ‘thank-you’s and being shown the value of their work over a costly banquet or a public advertisement, funds need not get in the way of good recognition!

3. Volunteers said that the volunteer activities they are least interested in are manual labour, crafts, cooking, and fundraising. According to the 2010 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP), fundraising is the most common activity in which organizations engage volunteers. Instead, volunteers said that their preference is to work directly with people benefiting from their volunteering, or in opportunities where they can apply professional or technological skills.

These findings ring true in my own experiences as a volunteer. I really appreciate it when I am told I did a good job, or that a client made special mention of my work – it shows me that giving my time truly made a difference, which is the reason I volunteer in the first place. Conversely, I tend to avoid going to volunteer appreciation parties or awards ceremonies. My dislike for big social events is a personal preference (I’d much rather stay home with my cats!), but even the most outgoing and social volunteers are likely busy just like me.  It is very difficult to schedule an event that every volunteer can come to, and, if that is the only time made for recognition, then a lot of volunteers won’t receive any at all.

VolunteersThe good news is that while our sector may at times drop the ball on volunteer recognition, the changes recommended by the 2013 Volunteer Recognition Study are very attainable. We already know the value of our volunteers – now we just have to remember to communicate that to them! Read the whole study for more straightforward tips and ideas on how to step up your organization’s volunteer recognition.

For more from Volunteer Canada on volunteer recognition, check out their other resources.

Sam Kriviak
Volunteer Alberta

 

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Coping After Natural Disasters – Care for your community with Psychological First Aid

Guest post by Owen Thompson, Alberta Museums Association

Albertans are no strangers to natural disasters. We have been faced with the threat of wildfire, flood, avalanche, extreme storms, extreme heat, tornados, the list goes on.

Yet, even within the framework of an experienced and professional infrastructure, the unprecedented flooding in summer of 2013 left a lasting impression on Alberta. It very literally changed the landscape of the Rockies in some areas and along the Bow River specifically. As one researcher from UBC explained, “the river widened substantially and degraded up to two meters in some places as the channel pattern was reorganized completely.”

Billions of dollars have been spent to recover from those few days almost three years ago. But the damage was not just physical; it also had psychological impact on many people, such as nonprofit staff and volunteers who were engaged in the aftermath of the floods, as well as the individuals they helped.

ThoughtfuNatural disasters, like other traumatic events, can have a last effect on the mental health of all those involved. Years later, residents of High River continue to report feeling “jittery” in June, or when heavy rains come through. The stress levels and anxiety that come with facing such drastic events can be debilitating. Helplessness can set in and action may stop when it is needed most. However, similar to the ways we mitigate physical damage, there are also ways to mitigate psychological damage.

For that reason, the Alberta Museums Association, through its Museum Flood Funding Program, is proud to be partnering with Volunteer Alberta and Alberta Health Services (AHS) to offer two workshops on Psychological First Aid (PFA) in southern Alberta.

Psychological First Aid (PFA) provides the tools Albertans working in the aftermath of natural disasters need to help other members of their communities. PFA can also lessen the emotional and mental impact for those workers themselves.

The PFA workshops provides tools and methods to:

  • offer practical care without forcing it
  • listen without pressure
  • connect people to the information and resources they need
  • protect people from further harm

The PFA workshops will address the deep psychological effects of trauma, with a focus on the aftermath of disaster situations, by sharing methods that can aid in the recovery process. This training is a great opportunity for staff, volunteers, and individuals who work with those struggling after natural disasters.

The training uses a “stepped-care” approach that tailors the type of care to the needs of each person. Some people will need access to professional therapy, while other people will recover on their own. While PFA is the first line of defense against stress-related mental health issues, it cannot replace the level of care offered by a professional.

The PFA workshops will be held in two southern Alberta locations:

  • High River on May 12
  • Medicine Hat on June 23

Find out more information on the workshops and register today.

 

Owen Thompson
Flood Advisory Lead
Alberta Museums Association

 

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Leadership, Respect, and Innovation – Notes from the Action Generation Residency

Drew Noiles, Volunteer Alberta Learning and Technology Coordinator, attended the Alberta Youth VOLUNTEER! Action Generation Residency in Banff in August, a leadership learning opportunity for young people.

Forest2We live in a world progressively captivated by what it means to truly lead. The leadership residency assembled about 25 of us for a unique, hands-on learning opportunity with the ultimate purpose of developing our individual and collective leadership skills, all while savoring a humbling dose of mountain culture.

Our residency took place at the breathtakingly beautiful Banff Centre. Alliteration aside, it began with a simple introduction, an ice-breaker, and a quote:

“One of the challenges of being a leader is mastering the shift from having others define your goals to being the architect of the organization’s purposes and objectives” (Mary Parker Follett, 1919)

Taped on the wall were group guidelines and reference points on how to get the most out of our leadership residency. One of these guiding messages stood out to me; in a dark blue sharpie it simply stated: Be Fit & Well.

It’s a statement that I have now come to understand to be synonymous with stepping outside of your fears, and allowing yourself to be open and in the moment. There is a very welcomed perspective change – an epiphany if you will – that takes place when everyone in a room begins from a place of equality and respect. This was a delightful transition to which our group was receptive and enthusiastic.

Over the course of the next three and a half days we were fed. We were fed well, and we were fed often. Looking back, having that amount of delectable treats available to you at all times really does enhance the entire experience. Keeping spirits high and eagerness abundant.

There were many topics discussed throughout our stay. Starting with collaboration and coaching, leading into goal setting, and understanding the importance of prototyping. The leadership residency provided us all the opportunity to not only identify challenges, but to address them in a safe space.

The lessons from the leadership residency that I am going to incorporate into my daily work:

  • Listening is something you are accountable for; listening is a responsibility.
  • Fail. We should be encouraged to fail, but to fail fast.  Creativity comes from allowing yourself to make mistakes.
  • The truth: great leaders are needed to shape a better world; and that type of leadership is rooted in the understanding of both wise practices and creative new approaches.

By the end I was left feeling very much a part of a community that inspires one another to take risks, to develop new ideas, and to find solutions for the present and future. Because in the end, that’s what learning is: understanding something you’ve understood before but in a new way.

Drew Noiles
Volunteer Alberta

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