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2019 Member Spotlight Rewind: Tips from nonprofits for nonprofits

In 2019, Alberta nonprofits faced new challenges. Together, we collaborated, advocated, and delivered innovative solutions. At Volunteer Alberta, we also featured our Members’ fantastic work including their insights and successes. 

So in case, you missed it in 2019, here is a breakdown of what some of our Members accomplished and their tips for you and your nonprofit: 

Advocacy

CCVO (Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations) helps Alberta nonprofits make a difference in our sector by teaching and sharing their knowledge in policy and advocacy work. Last year, CCVO developed an election toolkit to help nonprofits in their preparation for the Alberta election.

CCVO’s tip for nonprofits? Speak up in every way you can during election time. 

“If we stay silent during an election campaign, we let other sectors drive the agenda, which can mean that we won’t see meaningful commitments from political parties on issues that matter to the nonprofit sector.”

Community building 

One of Hinton FCSS’s main goals is to foster community connection and reduce social isolation. As a result, informal giving or volunteering organically flourishes in their programs and services.

Hinton FCSS’s tip for nonprofits? “Friends are just strangers waiting to happen.” 

Hinton FCSS launched a Friendly Visitor Program: a program brought to life by people offering their friendship to another person. Instead of volunteers doing bare minimum visits, volunteers tend to turn strangers into life-long family friends, connecting and building the community in Hinton.

St. Albert CIVC, also known as St. Albert’s hidden gem, celebrated its 40th birthday in 2019 as the go-to place for volunteer matching and recognition. Its success is due in large part to their understanding that community building stems directly from volunteer appreciation.

St. Albert CIVC’s tip for nonprofits? When it comes to planning volunteer appreciation events, keeping it simple always works best.

St. Albert CIVC’s Coffee Break program partners with local coffee businesses to distribute coupons for free coffee to volunteers as a way to thank them for their contributions to the community.

Risk Management

Capacity building organizations like the Edmonton Chamber of Voluntary Organizations (ECVO) provide education and guidance on not only managing risk, but also foundational knowledge for nonprofits in their community.

ECVO’s tip for nonprofits? When it comes to mitigating risk, nonprofits should consider exposure to any possible risks.

“In addition to general comprehensive liability insurance, director and officer insurance is a must. Cyber insurance is quickly becoming a standard insurance inclusion.”

Volunteer recruitment & engagement 

In 2018, Propellus officially launched a new website called VolunteerConnector, Alberta’s first platform that connects volunteers with available opportunities shared by nonprofits across Alberta.

Propellus’s tip for nonprofits? Inform your volunteer program with current data and trends. 

“Implement our research in training for volunteer engagement and recruitment. It’s the first time real-time information has been available in our province, so it means we can help people learn about volunteerism as trends change.”

Fringe Theatre has a unique challenge to recruit, onboard, and engage more than 1,200 volunteers for their annual Fringe Festival in Edmonton. And, their volunteer program is hugely successful. So, how do they do it?

Fringe Theatre’s tip for nonprofits? Use the 10 Steps to Volunteer Screening as the foundation for your volunteer program.

While screening can take a lot of resources, both financially and in staff time, according to Fringe Theatre, it is a worthwhile investment. “Without a good screening program in place, you will spend more time dealing with performance, disciplinary, or retention issues in the future.”

Youth engagement 

What 4-H Alberta does differently is that they create a safe and supportive environment that invites youth to not only govern their clubs but also direct their learning and skills development in any subject that interests them.

4-H Alberta’s tip for nonprofits? Create a program that is flexible for young people’s input and participation. 

“4-H members can pursue whatever projects they can dream up so that potential is perhaps the most appealing reason for youth to join 4-H.”

Vegreville & District FCSS’s Youth Making A Change (YMAC) successfully engages students in grades 10 to 12 in board governance, and as a result, encourages succession planning for the future of our sector.

Vegreville & District FCSS’s tip for nonprofits? Provide appropriate training for your board to mentor and engage youth.

“This can include not putting the youth on the spot or forcing them to participate in a conversation, warning them when a topic may become intense, and offering them words of encouragement throughout the meetings.”

Do you want tips like these and resources before everyone else? Join our network and receive a monthly, Member Exclusive newsletter with specially curated resources. Learn more about Membership.

Adrienne Vansevenandt

Volunteer Alberta

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Member Spotlight: Vegreville & District FCSS inspire youth to engage in board governance and nonprofit part 2

Youth engagement has been a hot topic in the nonprofit sector and community for the last several years. Nonprofits want to know how to reach young people and keep them engaged. Especially when it comes to getting young people at decision-making tables to support succession planning for the nonprofit sector.

But, youth engagement goes beyond describing and understanding millennials or generation Z. It’s about creating unique opportunities for youth to have a voice and bring fresh perspectives that fill existing gaps for nonprofits and your community.

This is exactly what Vegreville and District FCSS is doing with their Youth Making A Change program. Youth Making A Change (YMAC) successfully engages students in grades 10 to 12 in board governance, and as a result, encourages succession planning for the future of our sector.

Last year, we covered how Vegreville and District FCSS engages youth in board governance through this program, so we decided to provide an update of how their program is making a difference in their community.

Inspiring youth to get involved in governance and nonprofit

YMAC inspires, equips and mobilizes youth to take action to make changes in their community and learn new skills through service. When Vegreville & District first created YMAC, there were no programs in which youth were taught about leadership and community engagement, and also given a first-hand board and community project experience.

While most youths have the opportunity to join in sports, or other after-school activities, there was not a space for youth who possessed an interest in volunteerism and leadership skills in a more formal setting. YMAC was able to fill that void by creating a safe space for the students to come once a week and take action in bettering themselves and their community.

“The program has been effective for the youth,” says Julie Gottselig, Manager at Vegreville and District FCSS. “When going through their evaluations, 8 out of the 10-youth said that they feel that because of YMAC, they can make a difference in their community. Having this program available in the community is vital to help inspire youth and show them that they can make a difference.”

As a result, many young people that participated in YMAC now volunteer in the Vegreville community. A few students even mentioned that they want to work in human services after they graduate thanks to the program. That is, YMAC inspires young people with a hands-on opportunity to learn and understand the value and impact of the nonprofit sector.

Impact on Vegreville nonprofits

According to Vegreville and District FCSS, YMAC Board Mentors appreciate and see the value of having a youth member on their board as it brings in a fresh face and new ideas. One Board Mentor said this about their experience:

“It’s inspiring to have young people be interested in not only being a part of their community but also giving back to it. It’s great to see them being involved in such an impactful way.” – Joanna Karczmarek, Board Mentor at Vegreville Food Bank

Because of these positive experiences through YMAC, many Vegreville nonprofit boards request to have youth join them for the next YMAC intake. Other Vegreville nonprofit boards even get a second youth member to join them in the following years!

How nonprofits can engage youth in board governance

To engage youth in board governance in your community, Vegreville and District FCSS recommends providing appropriate training for your board. The training must teach board members on how to be mentors for youth.

More specifically, being a mentor means knowing the different ways to make sure youth are comfortable and have an enjoyable experience as a board member themselves.

“This can include not putting the youth on the spot or forcing them to participate in a conversation, warning them when a topic may become intense, and offering them words of encouragement throughout the meetings,” says Emma Murray, FCSS Child Youth and Family Programmer.

According to Vegreville and District FCSS, providing this training is what makes YMAC possible and successful. Beyond training, they also recommend getting youth involved in being a part of events and planning. They find YMAC students enjoy boards more when there are specific events that give them an opportunity to show their more creative side during board meetings.

Vegreville and District FCSS is a nonprofit organization that prevents crisis and takes care of the social well-being of the community by offering low/no cost programs and services to the Town of Vegreville and the western portion of the County of Minburn.

Do you want to learn how to get youth to join your board? Contact Vegreville & District FCSS for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Member Spotlight: CCVO (Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations) prepares nonprofits for the Alberta election

Government relations for many nonprofits can be a challenge. Where do you start? And, how do you amplify your voice, especially during pivotal moments, like Alberta’s upcoming election on April 16th?

This is where nonprofits like CCVO (Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations) step in. CCVO helps Alberta nonprofits make a difference in our sector by teaching and sharing their knowledge in policy and advocacy work.

Creating the Nonprofit Election Toolkit

This year, as part of their support for nonprofits, CCVO developed an election toolkit to help guide nonprofits in their preparation for the upcoming Alberta election.

“To generate interest in the election early on, we identified the major sections we wanted to have in the toolkit and compiled themed blog posts that went live a couple of times a month,” says Alexa Briggs, Manager, Policy & Research at CCVO. “Each blog post briefly foreshadowed the toolkit. We then rolled them up into one final document as an entire resource: The Alberta Nonprofit Election Toolkit.”

The toolkit highlights an election engagement strategy meant to help nonprofits engage with confidence in the election cycle. Part of this strategy involves a #nonprofitsvote campaign:

“One of the major political parties will form the provincial government and will have direct decision-making power over issues that impact all of us. If we use our collective voice to encourage #nonprofitsvote, we can make a difference” Alexa says.

Encouraging nonprofits to vote

In addition to the Election Advocacy Toolkit, CCVO developed and released a Vote Kit, specifically designed to provide tools to support #nonprofitsvote efforts. With this Vote Kit, organizations will be able to:

  1. Make a #nonprofitsvote plan with handy templates to help communicate in a nonpartisan way with staff, boards, volunteers, and clients.
  2. Get easy access to information on how and where to vote.
  3. Find information on issues important to the sector.
  4. Join the #nonprofitsvote campaign to show the strength, breadth, and importance of the sector by publicly committing to vote.

By providing these supports to fellow organizations, CCVO encourages all nonprofits in Alberta to engage their staff, volunteers, board members, and people they serve to participate in the 2019 Alberta provincial election.

“If we stay silent during an election campaign, we let other sectors drive the agenda, which can mean that we won’t see meaningful commitments from political parties on issues that matter to the nonprofit sector” says Alexa.

Use CCVO’s election and vote kits to stay informed about the platforms and positions of all major parties, and how they impact the nonprofit sector so that on April 16th your vote will be, as CCVO likes to say, “armed with knowledge”!

CCVO promotes and strengthens the nonprofit sector by developing and sharing resources and knowledge, building connections, leading collaborative work, and giving voice to critical issues affecting the sector.

 

Niabi Kapoor

Volunteer Alberta SCiP Intern

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Leading the way: 2018 Member Spotlight rewind

Volunteer Alberta Members are leaders in the nonprofit voluntary sector. Last year, we started a new blog series called Member Spotlight to highlight and share their successes and leading practices in our communities across Alberta.

By sharing each other’s knowledge and expertise, we hope to strengthen, promote and connect the sector. After all, we are better, together.

For January, we thought we’d kick off the New Year by celebrating the amazing work of our members. Here is how our members led the way in their communities in 2018.

Capacity building

Grande Prairie Volunteer Services Bureau (GPVSB) provides a range of services to nonprofits and recognition programs for volunteers in their community. “Our impact on the community becomes more visible as the fruits of our labour become more apparent,” says Carol-Anne Pasemko, Executive Director. “As people become more aware of what we offer, we’re getting busier and busier. When you’re successful with one organization, it brings two more in the door.”

Volunteer Lethbridge helps local nonprofits grow volunteer capacity is by promoting and leveraging the Serving Communities Internship Program (SCiP) in their community. SCiP connects nonprofits with post-secondary students by facilitating internship opportunities for students to apply their skills and knowledge.

Community outreach and services

Cold Lake & District FCSS is building a vibrant community with neighbourhood block parties. “Once somebody has a block party, they’re hooked,” says Leanne Draper, Volunteer Services Program Facilitator at Cold Lake & District FCSS. “Individuals and families get to meet each other and form social bonds that they might not have otherwise.”

The Information Volunteer Centre (IVC) for Strathcona County generously gives back to their community through their various programs and services. But, one program, in particular, is unique in how it supports other nonprofits in the community. The ‘We Care… so We Share!’ program helps to enhance the effectiveness of other nonprofits by providing much-needed equipment or items free of charge.

Through its various outreach programs, Stony Plain FCSS builds a local network that supports and establishes community resilience. Stony Plain FCSS’s most recent program, Cut it Out, leverages existing community relationships to create a safe haven for victims of family violence.

The Voice of Albertans with Disabilities is a provincial organization actively working to reduce barriers by encouraging and advocating for full participation, accessibility and equality. Through their programs and services, they are dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with disabilities, as well as ensuring people with disabilities’ voices are heard.

Youth engagement

carya encourages youth engagement by hosting a full day leadership conference for 12-18- year-old girls, called ‘HERstory’. Last December, HERstory provided young women the opportunity to connect with each other outside of their regular social circle and explore their power to make a positive difference in their community.

Vegreville and District FCSS takes a unique approach to encourage youth to volunteer through a program called, Youth Making a Change. The program successfully engages students in grades 10-12 in board governance, and as a result, encourages succession planning for the future of our sector.

Volunteer Airdrie breaks down barriers for youth engagement through the Leadership Empowerment and Achieving a Difference (LEAD) program. LEAD is a ten-week program that is free of charge for youth grades 7-12 with ten in-class sessions and 20 hours of community service or volunteering.

We hope our members’ stories from 2018 encourage and affirm your own organization’s initiatives and community outreach. Stay tuned for more inspiration and feel-good stories as we will continue to spotlight Volunteer Alberta Members in 2019.

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Member Spotlight: IVC for Strathcona County’s spirit of giving

As the holidays draw near, you can feel that the spirit of giving is in the air. It’s a great time of year that reminds us of how powerful giving back and spreading kindness can be. But, Alberta nonprofits remind us each day; they model this spirit of giving by voluntarily and selflessly giving back to their communities year-round.

Throughout the year, the Information Volunteer Centre (IVC) for Strathcona County generously gives back to their community through their various programs and services. But, one program, in particular, is unique in how it supports other nonprofits in the community.

Giving to local nonprofits and their community

The ‘We Care… so We Share!’ program helps to enhance the effectiveness of other nonprofits by providing much needed equipment or items free of charge. Many of the items can be used for fundraising events, and organizations are welcome to borrow any item. Items include a cotton candy machine, an overhead projector, a bookbinding machine, just to name a few.

“I can tell you it’s wildly successful. In fact, we’ve recently received a grant from Suncor to increase our inventory as we were getting so many requests for equipment,” says Judy Ferguson, Executive Director at IVC for Strathcona County.

Impact on the community

Many nonprofits can’t afford to rent or buy this type of equipment for organizational use. As a result, the ‘We Care… so We Share!’ program helps nonprofits in the Strathcona County community to save money.

“It’s an interesting program that is very popular here in the county, and I don’t know who else could do it,” says Judy. “It’s a difficult thing for other organizations to purchase equipment like that and make it available free of charge to community organizations.”

By spending less on equipment for overhead purposes or fundraising events, it allows nonprofits to maximize their dollar for their causes. That is, nonprofits can re-allocate their funds to achieve more social good.

IVC for Strathcona County actively works to achieve inclusion and affordability, and their ‘We Care… so We Share!’ program is an example of this work. By considering the needs of the community and filling that need, they support and empower nonprofits, big or small.

The Information and Volunteer Centre (IVC) for Strathcona County has operated for 43 years. The organization gives back and strengthens its community by providing pathways to connect, engage and empower residents with volunteer opportunities and services, and by providing training and information to other nonprofits and community organizations.

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