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2019 Member Spotlight Rewind: Tips from nonprofits for nonprofits

In 2019, Alberta nonprofits faced new challenges. Together, we collaborated, advocated, and delivered innovative solutions. At Volunteer Alberta, we also featured our Members’ fantastic work including their insights and successes. 

So in case, you missed it in 2019, here is a breakdown of what some of our Members accomplished and their tips for you and your nonprofit: 

Advocacy

CCVO (Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations) helps Alberta nonprofits make a difference in our sector by teaching and sharing their knowledge in policy and advocacy work. Last year, CCVO developed an election toolkit to help nonprofits in their preparation for the Alberta election.

CCVO’s tip for nonprofits? Speak up in every way you can during election time. 

“If we stay silent during an election campaign, we let other sectors drive the agenda, which can mean that we won’t see meaningful commitments from political parties on issues that matter to the nonprofit sector.”

Community building 

One of Hinton FCSS’s main goals is to foster community connection and reduce social isolation. As a result, informal giving or volunteering organically flourishes in their programs and services.

Hinton FCSS’s tip for nonprofits? “Friends are just strangers waiting to happen.” 

Hinton FCSS launched a Friendly Visitor Program: a program brought to life by people offering their friendship to another person. Instead of volunteers doing bare minimum visits, volunteers tend to turn strangers into life-long family friends, connecting and building the community in Hinton.

St. Albert CIVC, also known as St. Albert’s hidden gem, celebrated its 40th birthday in 2019 as the go-to place for volunteer matching and recognition. Its success is due in large part to their understanding that community building stems directly from volunteer appreciation.

St. Albert CIVC’s tip for nonprofits? When it comes to planning volunteer appreciation events, keeping it simple always works best.

St. Albert CIVC’s Coffee Break program partners with local coffee businesses to distribute coupons for free coffee to volunteers as a way to thank them for their contributions to the community.

Risk Management

Capacity building organizations like the Edmonton Chamber of Voluntary Organizations (ECVO) provide education and guidance on not only managing risk, but also foundational knowledge for nonprofits in their community.

ECVO’s tip for nonprofits? When it comes to mitigating risk, nonprofits should consider exposure to any possible risks.

“In addition to general comprehensive liability insurance, director and officer insurance is a must. Cyber insurance is quickly becoming a standard insurance inclusion.”

Volunteer recruitment & engagement 

In 2018, Propellus officially launched a new website called VolunteerConnector, Alberta’s first platform that connects volunteers with available opportunities shared by nonprofits across Alberta.

Propellus’s tip for nonprofits? Inform your volunteer program with current data and trends. 

“Implement our research in training for volunteer engagement and recruitment. It’s the first time real-time information has been available in our province, so it means we can help people learn about volunteerism as trends change.”

Fringe Theatre has a unique challenge to recruit, onboard, and engage more than 1,200 volunteers for their annual Fringe Festival in Edmonton. And, their volunteer program is hugely successful. So, how do they do it?

Fringe Theatre’s tip for nonprofits? Use the 10 Steps to Volunteer Screening as the foundation for your volunteer program.

While screening can take a lot of resources, both financially and in staff time, according to Fringe Theatre, it is a worthwhile investment. “Without a good screening program in place, you will spend more time dealing with performance, disciplinary, or retention issues in the future.”

Youth engagement 

What 4-H Alberta does differently is that they create a safe and supportive environment that invites youth to not only govern their clubs but also direct their learning and skills development in any subject that interests them.

4-H Alberta’s tip for nonprofits? Create a program that is flexible for young people’s input and participation. 

“4-H members can pursue whatever projects they can dream up so that potential is perhaps the most appealing reason for youth to join 4-H.”

Vegreville & District FCSS’s Youth Making A Change (YMAC) successfully engages students in grades 10 to 12 in board governance, and as a result, encourages succession planning for the future of our sector.

Vegreville & District FCSS’s tip for nonprofits? Provide appropriate training for your board to mentor and engage youth.

“This can include not putting the youth on the spot or forcing them to participate in a conversation, warning them when a topic may become intense, and offering them words of encouragement throughout the meetings.”

Do you want tips like these and resources before everyone else? Join our network and receive a monthly, Member Exclusive newsletter with specially curated resources. Learn more about Membership.

Adrienne Vansevenandt

Volunteer Alberta

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Guest Blog: How to develop emotional intelligence as a leader

We are excited to welcome leadership coach, Kathy Archer, to the Volunteer Alberta blog! This is the second of a two-part series on leadership and emotional intelligence. Read last week’s blog: Why successful leaders put intelligence and emotion together

Developing emotional intelligence (EI) takes time. The ability to recognize and manage your emotions requires self-reflection and personal growth.  Becoming more emotionally intelligent requires you to access your inner wisdom, or as I call it, your Inner Guidance System (IGS). Your IGS is your emotions, thoughts, feelings, and body sensations. You deliberately access your IGS by repeatedly cycling through the Inner Guidance Cycle (IGC):

Pause

Take a deep breath and tune in. If you have time, write down what’s going on for you.

Ponder

Reflect on what going on inside your body and mind as well as in your surroundings.

  • What emotions are you feeling?
  • What just triggered your reaction?
  • What meaning are you attaching to that event?

Pivot

Choose to see the event in a new perspective that will allow you to feel the way you want and move you forward in this moment.

Proceed

Get back into action by responding rather than reacting to the event.

Repeat

The final note about using the IGC is that to increase your EI you must constantly be looping back through the Pause, Ponder, Pivot, and Proceed steps throughout your day. Committing to becoming clearer on your emotions and feelings, and learning to manage them rather than attempt to banish them, will put you back in the driver’s seat.

The most effective leaders welcome their emotions. They know their emotions are their constant companion and they learn to manage and control them. It’s a powerful shift!

Learn more about using the Inner Guidance Cycle to access your inner wisdom.

Leaders often hit a point where they find themselves in over their heads and wondering if they have what it takes to lead. In Kathy Archer’s online courses and leadership coaching sessions, she teaches leaders the inner and outer tools to restore their lost confidence so they can move from surviving to thriving in both leadership and life.

Computer

Guest blog: Why successful leaders put intelligence and emotion together

We are excited to welcome leadership coach, Kathy Archer, back to the Volunteer Alberta blog! This is the first of a two-part series on leadership and emotional intelligence.

You need to be smart to be a leader. You need to have training, education and intelligence to be successful.

If you are a leader, that’s probably what you believe. In fact, many leaders feel imposter-like because they don’t have the proper credentials. Moving up the career ladder is often a result of doing great in a frontline position. We then find ourselves in management without the “right” qualifications to be there. This lack of credentials leaves us worried we will be exposed for the frauds we feel we are.

While you need a baseline level of both intellect and training, leadership is much more than your IQ level or the letters after your name. One of the key indicators of a successful leader is their level of Emotional Intelligence (EI). In fact, EI is a higher predictor of a leader’s success than IQ. Let me explain.

Emotional intelligence (EI) and managing your emotions as a leader

Leaders need to have the extraordinary ability to manage their emotions. Leadership is a tough gig! It can be stressful and demanding. In a leadership position, you are juggling a constant stream of interruptions, reports, meetings and people. You think on your feet, deal with criticism and, at times, you must communicate hard messages.

But here’s the thing, when everything is chaotic in the organization, effective leaders bring a sense of calm and control. As teams get bogged down, an effective leader recharges everyone with inspiration, motivation and energy. When tension rises between staff members, an effective leader takes on those charged conversations to resolve issues. The leader’s emotional stability propels successful organizations forward.

For a leader to be all these things, they much have a high degree of EI. Emotional Intelligence, coined by Daniel Goleman, is the ability to both recognize and manage your emotions.

Notice I said manage emotions, not suppress them, turn them off, or tune them out. EI is not about eliminating emotions; it’s about tuning in to them- recognizing them for what they are and using them to guide future behavior.

Emotional intelligence in practice

Take, for example, experiencing fear in the middle of a meeting after being asked a question. Fear puts us on alert, releases adrenaline into our body, and prepares us to fight, flee, or freeze.

Here is where EI kicks in. An emotionally aware leader will notice physical sensations in their body, like belly tightening, heart racing, and hand clenching. They will also take note of the subsequent feelings of anxiety, shame, or frustration.

Rather than reacting by sending a biting comment back, ending the meeting quickly, or backing down, the leader with increased EI will look at their inner dialogue. By becoming conscious of what they are telling themselves about this situation, they can decide if the thought is accurate and helpful or if it needs to be changed.

When a leader does this inner work, they can react rationally. Instead of the fight, flee, or freeze reaction, the leader with EI may respond by saying, “That’s a great question, and I don’t have the answer to it currently. I will find out and get back you by Friday.” They haven’t lost their sense of inner power. In fact, they’ve regained their inner power.

In next week’s article, you will learn how to further develop emotional intelligence by accessing your Inner Guidance System (IGS).

Leaders often hit a point where they find themselves in over their heads and wondering if they have what it takes to lead. In Kathy Archer’s online courses and leadership coaching sessions, she teaches leaders the inner and outer tools to restore their lost confidence so they can move from surviving to thriving in both leadership and life.

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Volunteer Screening: Finding the Right Fit Makes All the Difference

This blog was first published on the Community and Adult Learning Program website on November 28, 2017.


Volunteer screening is key to your organization’s success – it provides better volunteer matches, improves safety and quality of programs, and reduces risks and liabilities. Screening is about making informed, reasonable judgements about people based on information gathered from a variety of sources. It begins before onboarding a volunteer and continues throughout their involvement with your organization.

The Volunteer Screening Program (VSP) supports non-profits to implement effective volunteer screening practices. The program has two primary components:

  1. Education & Training
  2. Financial Support

EDUCATION & TRAINING

Data gathered from our workshops and presentations showed us that the biggest challenge faced by organizations is access to resources and best practices related to volunteer screening. Organizations want to maximize their volunteer engagement strategies and support a deeper understanding of participation, privacy, and protection at all levels – volunteer managers, leadership, and board.

Organizations also shared they want to hear from their peers. It’s important to have a space to share organizational best practices, discuss challenges faced by the community, and learn from the experts (e.g. police services or insurance agencies). Exploring organizational mindsets around volunteer screening and employing best practices from peers and experts can lead to new solutions and possibilities!

For these reasons, VSP offers lots of free online resources including templates, tools, and workbooks, as well as interactive learning opportunities such as webinars and in-person learning forums.

Access these education and training opportunities and support volunteer screening best practices at your non-profit.


FINANCIAL SUPPORT

VSP provides funding to eligible organizations to support development in the areas of volunteer screening as well as funding for eligible organizations to support costs associated with Vulnerable Sector Checks (VSCs).

The Volunteer Screening Development Grant is designed to help support organizations in developing effective screening practices and processes. The grant provides $2,000 to support non-profits facing resource and capacity challenges in the area of volunteer screening.

The Vulnerable Sector Check Fee Waiver alleviates costs associated with VSCs. The waiver is available for organizations operating in participating communities. Eligible organizations must work with vulnerable populations and engage volunteers in approved positions of trust and authority in order to access the fee waiver.

Find more information on financial assistance.

Daniela Seiferling
Volunteer Alberta

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Leadership Takes Many Forms

The Casey Executive Coaching Leader as Coach Program is a developmental program for nonprofit leaders focused on building inclusive leadership practices and practical coaching skills. A leader-as-coach approach helps leaders, as well as staff, to develop to their highest potential.

In a unique partnership, Volunteer Alberta was given a spot in the program at a reduced cost in exchange for sharing the program with others. Our Serving Communities Internship Program (SCiP) Coordinator, Tim Henderson, signed up for the program to develop his mentorship style. Tim found the concepts, theories, and techniques, introduced by Melissa Casey, helped him to understand what kind of leader he is and how he can use his skills to better help others.

We asked Tim what he learned from the course. If you choose to take the Leader as Coach Program you may learn something similar, or you may focus on your own learning goals instead!


VA: What did you experience from the course?

TH: It was fascinating to hear from the other participants in the group and get a sense of the roles they play in their own organizations. We discussed what leadership meant to each of us and found each person in the group had completely different strengths and weaknesses. What was interesting to see was how those traits shaped their respective leadership styles.

Hearing the stories of others helped me appreciate my own strengths, but they also helped me understand the steps I can take to improve my weaknesses and become a better leader.

Throughout the program we were given a number of opportunities to practice ‘active listening’ in both one-on-one and group scenarios. This type of listening helped us build trust amongst ourselves and ended up paving the way for more fruitful conversations as the course progressed.

VA: What did you take away from the course overall?

TH: Overall, I learned that leadership takes many forms. Every personality is different, but through active listening, anyone can provide leadership in their organization. We all have something different to bring to the table and, if given the tools, we are all capable of stepping into leadership. Through this program, Melissa (our host), provided these tools. Coming back to my organization after finishing the course, I found that I was able to connect and communicate with my colleagues more effectively.


Leader as Coach is designed for the nonprofit sector. Continuous learning and development supports positive change in ourselves and our work. Implementing change in our lives, work, and organizations can be challenging, so we get excited about opportunities that build in time to have practical hands-on experience and provide transformative leadership learning! Tim would recommend this course for anyone who is looking for personal or professional development related to leadership.

Do you want to sign up for Leader as Coach? Register to participate in the fall session beginning in October. This program is offered in both Calgary and Edmonton. Find out more about this program on the Casey Executive Coaching website.

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