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Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

Courtesy of Orange County Register

Courtesy of Orange County Register

In early August, the Edmonton Humane Society (EHS) had to temporarily close its doors to owner-surrendered animals. For the first time in their 106 year history, they had too many animals to realistically care for. Within hours of the announcement, the EHS website was forced to temporarily shut down due to a huge amount of activity, and in the three days that followed their announcement, the public responded with 167 adoptions, a new record for EHS.

EHS knew when to ask for help; they knew that if animals continued to come through their doors that they may not receive the best care possible. They put the word out that they needed help and Edmontonians responded.

Many nonprofit organizations exist to help, whether it’s helping people, animals or the environment. The very nature of this sector is to provide assistance that is lacking; so why are many nonprofit organizations afraid to ask for help? How often do we sell ourselves short when we talk about what we do, whether its to clients or to potential funders?

Amanda Palmer has a great TED talk called the Art of Asking and the shame that can be associated with it (she’s rocking some wild eyebrows so be prepared). Palmer also discusses the power of crowdsourcing and social media, which EHS did wonderfully with their recent crisis. When their website had to be shut down due to overactivity, their Facebook and Twitter became their main communication tools. They had to act very quickly to get information up on these outlets, which they did, and that allowed them to solve their overcrowding problem within just a few days.

Lisa Michetti, Member Engagement Manager

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