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2019 Member Spotlight Rewind: Tips from nonprofits for nonprofits

In 2019, Alberta nonprofits faced new challenges. Together, we collaborated, advocated, and delivered innovative solutions. At Volunteer Alberta, we also featured our Members’ fantastic work including their insights and successes. 

So in case, you missed it in 2019, here is a breakdown of what some of our Members accomplished and their tips for you and your nonprofit: 

Advocacy

CCVO (Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations) helps Alberta nonprofits make a difference in our sector by teaching and sharing their knowledge in policy and advocacy work. Last year, CCVO developed an election toolkit to help nonprofits in their preparation for the Alberta election.

CCVO’s tip for nonprofits? Speak up in every way you can during election time. 

“If we stay silent during an election campaign, we let other sectors drive the agenda, which can mean that we won’t see meaningful commitments from political parties on issues that matter to the nonprofit sector.”

Community building 

One of Hinton FCSS’s main goals is to foster community connection and reduce social isolation. As a result, informal giving or volunteering organically flourishes in their programs and services.

Hinton FCSS’s tip for nonprofits? “Friends are just strangers waiting to happen.” 

Hinton FCSS launched a Friendly Visitor Program: a program brought to life by people offering their friendship to another person. Instead of volunteers doing bare minimum visits, volunteers tend to turn strangers into life-long family friends, connecting and building the community in Hinton.

St. Albert CIVC, also known as St. Albert’s hidden gem, celebrated its 40th birthday in 2019 as the go-to place for volunteer matching and recognition. Its success is due in large part to their understanding that community building stems directly from volunteer appreciation.

St. Albert CIVC’s tip for nonprofits? When it comes to planning volunteer appreciation events, keeping it simple always works best.

St. Albert CIVC’s Coffee Break program partners with local coffee businesses to distribute coupons for free coffee to volunteers as a way to thank them for their contributions to the community.

Risk Management

Capacity building organizations like the Edmonton Chamber of Voluntary Organizations (ECVO) provide education and guidance on not only managing risk, but also foundational knowledge for nonprofits in their community.

ECVO’s tip for nonprofits? When it comes to mitigating risk, nonprofits should consider exposure to any possible risks.

“In addition to general comprehensive liability insurance, director and officer insurance is a must. Cyber insurance is quickly becoming a standard insurance inclusion.”

Volunteer recruitment & engagement 

In 2018, Propellus officially launched a new website called VolunteerConnector, Alberta’s first platform that connects volunteers with available opportunities shared by nonprofits across Alberta.

Propellus’s tip for nonprofits? Inform your volunteer program with current data and trends. 

“Implement our research in training for volunteer engagement and recruitment. It’s the first time real-time information has been available in our province, so it means we can help people learn about volunteerism as trends change.”

Fringe Theatre has a unique challenge to recruit, onboard, and engage more than 1,200 volunteers for their annual Fringe Festival in Edmonton. And, their volunteer program is hugely successful. So, how do they do it?

Fringe Theatre’s tip for nonprofits? Use the 10 Steps to Volunteer Screening as the foundation for your volunteer program.

While screening can take a lot of resources, both financially and in staff time, according to Fringe Theatre, it is a worthwhile investment. “Without a good screening program in place, you will spend more time dealing with performance, disciplinary, or retention issues in the future.”

Youth engagement 

What 4-H Alberta does differently is that they create a safe and supportive environment that invites youth to not only govern their clubs but also direct their learning and skills development in any subject that interests them.

4-H Alberta’s tip for nonprofits? Create a program that is flexible for young people’s input and participation. 

“4-H members can pursue whatever projects they can dream up so that potential is perhaps the most appealing reason for youth to join 4-H.”

Vegreville & District FCSS’s Youth Making A Change (YMAC) successfully engages students in grades 10 to 12 in board governance, and as a result, encourages succession planning for the future of our sector.

Vegreville & District FCSS’s tip for nonprofits? Provide appropriate training for your board to mentor and engage youth.

“This can include not putting the youth on the spot or forcing them to participate in a conversation, warning them when a topic may become intense, and offering them words of encouragement throughout the meetings.”

Do you want tips like these and resources before everyone else? Join our network and receive a monthly, Member Exclusive newsletter with specially curated resources. Learn more about Membership.

Adrienne Vansevenandt

Volunteer Alberta

OASSIS

Sponsored blog: How is OASSIS different from other group employee benefit providers?

We work hard for our clients, whether they are long-term clients or organizations that are simply considering OASSIS.

Recently, we brought on a new large client who was looking to make major plan design changes along with merging many of their divisions. We helped them navigate the change by first quoting what they had and again for where they hoped to be.

We provided a transition plan so there were no surprises and we assured them that we would mirror their current plan design while implementing all desired changes. Once they decided to move to OASSIS, we put the plan of action into play.

However, there was one issue; their prior carrier had approved an expensive new life-saving drug that only had conditional approval from Health Canada. An insurance carrier would rarely reimburse a drug that isn’t fully approved for sale. So, we worked with senior management at Green Shield Canada, our health and dental provider, and we succeeded in allowing coverage to continue for this new drug!

This is just one example of the work we do for our clients. We are here for them and do whatever we can to help. Moving your Group Benefits Plan to OASSIS is simple and we do most of the work for you. In most cases, we can mirror your current plan and make the transition seamless for your employees.

Did you know? If you’re a Volunteer Alberta Member, you can access OASSIS employee benefits. Contact Brent Voisey at OASSIS, brent@oassisplan.com or by phone 1-888-233-5580, ext. 302 to find out more.

If you’re not a Volunteer Alberta Member, consider joining their network if you would like this kind of support and care for your employees!

Brent Voisey

Group Benefits Sales Executive at OASSIS

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The psychology behind the decline in giving and what you can do about it

It’s no secret that the number of people in Canada who give has been declining since 1990. This means charities and nonprofits have had to rely on a decreasing pool of donors for their fundraising and operational needs. But, the bigger question is why are fewer people donating than ever before and what can we do about it?

As a former psychology major, I wondered if any social psychology theories could help explain this phenomenon. During my research, I realized that my intuition was right. So, here are three social psychology theories that may point to why Canadians are donating less:

Social loafing

Have you ever been assigned a group project and noticed that some of your group members put in less effort than other group members? This is known as social loafing: the tendency for people to put in less effort because they are aware that there are more people to contribute to the same project or goal.

Now, imagine you send out a generic email asking for a donation. One of your potential donors receives the email and realizes that it was sent to numerous people. Based on the email content, there doesn’t seem to be much urgency to donate. So, your donor decides not to donate because “someone else will” eventually. This is social loafing in action.

What you can do about it

When you request a donation, it’s important to clearly articulate the donation’s impact (that every penny counts) and your financial need. Let your donors know that donations are low. Your donors may be more willing to help if they know how and why their contribution will make a difference.

Cognitive dissonance

Cognitive dissonance is the feeling of discomfort when you realize there’s an inconsistency between your attitudes and/or behaviours. So, you rationalize the attitude or behaviour to make yourself feel better.

For example, say someone donated once because they believe in your cause, but they decide against donating again and become uncomfortable. So, they justify their decision to make themselves feel better through objections like, “I needed the money more” or “my small donation won’t make much of difference.”

What you can do about it

Again, communicating the impact and value of a donation may motivate your donor to take action. But, consider taking it one step further by putting yourself in your donor’s shoes; tell your donor your organization understands not everyone can contribute monetarily. And instead, offer alternatives to cash donations such as volunteering or in-kind donations. Your donor may be more likely to give if they feel understood.

Social exchange theory

Social exchange theory is how we evaluate our relationships based on its costs and benefits, what we think we deserve, and whether there are better alternatives.

For example, if a friend doesn’t return your texts or calls, or cancels plans more frequently, we may wonder whether the friendship is worth our time. And if the costs outweigh what we put into the friendship, we will be more likely to end it. And it’s no different for your donors who will evaluate whether their social exchange (i.e., their donations, volunteer time, etc.) is reciprocated by your organization.

What you can do about it

Do you have a donor retention strategy? If not, now is the time to build one. And if you already have one, think of new or more ways you can thank your donors. For example, share your successful volunteer stories or your mission success stories that tell your donors how they helped to make a difference.

And when you ask for another donation, don’t start with big requests like legacy giving or large sums. Instead, build trust through the foot-in-the-door technique by asking for something small. As a result, your donor will be more likely to consider the big ask later on.

Are you looking for more funding ideas or resources? We can help!

Adrienne Vansevenandt

Volunteer Alberta

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Don’t wait for a crisis to diversify your revenue

For many nonprofits and charities, revenue diversification happens when a crisis strikes such as the loss of a primary funder or investor. But, if nonprofit organizations can be strategic and proactive in their revenue diversification, they can mitigate this risk.

At Volunteer Alberta, our leadership team has been working hard to diversify our funding. So, I sat down with our Executive Director, Karen Link, to discuss revenue diversification and how other nonprofits can get started.

What does revenue diversification mean to you?

Karen: It means financial sustainability – it’s looking at multiple revenue streams to mitigate risk and to reduce dependency on just a few sources of funding.

Why is it important for nonprofits?

Karen: Revenue diversification goes beyond risk mitigation and financial resilience. It’s demonstrating your relevance to more stakeholders. When you diversify your revenue, you have to think about who cares about what you care about. It’s not just the government. It ranges from ministries to corporations, to foundations, to individuals.

There are different sources of revenue such as:

  • Governments (federal, provincial, municipal)
  • Foundations (family, community or corporate)
  • Earned revenue (fee for programs and services)
  • Donations and fundraising (lotteries, casinos, donations)

And there are other emerging trends in revenue diversification including:

  • Saving costs by partnering on service provisions (shared staff, shared infrastructure, and shared programs and services).
  • New business models that are similar to social enterprises. For example, partnering with a private business that wants to do something that affects your clients. So, that’s something you could be a part of but not necessarily initiate.

How do organizations even begin the process of revenue diversification?

Karen: There are nine steps to revenue diversification. Step one is you need to understand the impetus for change. You need to understand the need to establish funding that’s reliable, flexible and varied from different sources. Your board needs to be on board as they have a role to play; they have to understand the vision and work their networks.

Once the need is clear, your organization undertakes other steps including a review of your funding sources within the last 10 years, identifying potential investors, evaluating the internal capacity you’ll need, consulting with others, and managing risk.

Finally, you develop your implementation strategy and put it into action. After that, it’s all about assessment and continuous improvement. Improve, scale slowly, and keep building within your means; you need the capacity and the time to do it.

What are the common barriers nonprofits experience when they seek to diversify their revenue?

Karen: Internal capacity is often the biggest barrier. You’ll have to be able to identify prospective new funding streams or investors and establish and maintain those relationships. You need dedicated people for any type of business development. You need to invest in the right people to generate more revenue.

Most times, people try to focus on business development with existing resources, but they don’t realize it takes additional resources to develop those business models and establish/maintain those relationships. You have to spend money to make money.

What tips/recommendations would you give to nonprofits struggling to find other sources of revenue?

Karen: The number one thing is to consult – talk to others about what they’ve done, talk to other organizations, engage your board, engage your staff, and think outside the box. Think about who cares about what you care about. Look at how people are making money and saving money.

There’s no one size fits all. But, when you talk to other people about how they’re diversifying their revenue and how they’re generating revenue, you can get ideas for your fund development plan.

Another important thing is to have a clear aspirational goal – what is it that you want to see? And then make and test your assumptions. This is your theory of change.

For example, your assumption could be I believe people would pay more for our services. And your theory of change could be if we build a platform where the reporting and resources would be so valuable, people will be inclined to pay. Be bold and put those assumptions out there and test them.

Are you ready to diversify your revenue? Get started with the 9 steps to revenue diversification!

Adrienne Vansevenandt

Volunteer Alberta

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Guest blog: Event liability tips from The Co-operators

Hosting an event can be an important part of any nonprofit’s activities; whether it’s to build awareness about your organization or to fundraise for a specific cause. Making sure you have the right insurance coverage for your event is important to protect you and your organization. But what kind of insurance do you need? Does your Commercial General Liability (CGL) policy cover your event?

Depending on the nature of your event, there are a couple of options available. For single or multi-day events, it may be best to purchase a Party Alcohol Liability (PAL). This coverage is available with or without the service of alcohol. Any claims from this event would be made against the PAL policy; therefore, protecting the claims experience of your organization’s CGL policy. This policy needs to be in place ahead of your event and there is an additional cost for the policy.

If you host events more frequently, insuring your events as a part of your CGL policy may be a better fit; provided that your insurer is aware. By doing so, you are not required to submit a new application for every event that you host, but in some cases, it could increase the cost of your policy.

No matter the event, your insurance advisor is there to help make sure you have the right coverage – it’s always best to discuss the details of your event with them ahead of time.

If you have questions or would like to learn more about insurance for nonprofits, please don’t hesitate to contact us or visit our website.

Dominique Nadeau

The Co-operators

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