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Leadership Takes Many Forms

The Casey Executive Coaching Leader as Coach Program is a developmental program for nonprofit leaders focused on building inclusive leadership practices and practical coaching skills. A leader-as-coach approach helps leaders, as well as staff, to develop to their highest potential.

In a unique partnership, Volunteer Alberta was given a spot in the program at a reduced cost in exchange for sharing the program with others. Our Serving Communities Internship Program (SCiP) Coordinator, Tim Henderson, signed up for the program to develop his mentorship style. Tim found the concepts, theories, and techniques, introduced by Melissa Casey, helped him to understand what kind of leader he is and how he can use his skills to better help others.

We asked Tim what he learned from the course. If you choose to take the Leader as Coach Program you may learn something similar, or you may focus on your own learning goals instead!


VA: What did you experience from the course?

TH: It was fascinating to hear from the other participants in the group and get a sense of the roles they play in their own organizations. We discussed what leadership meant to each of us and found each person in the group had completely different strengths and weaknesses. What was interesting to see was how those traits shaped their respective leadership styles.

Hearing the stories of others helped me appreciate my own strengths, but they also helped me understand the steps I can take to improve my weaknesses and become a better leader.

Throughout the program we were given a number of opportunities to practice ‘active listening’ in both one-on-one and group scenarios. This type of listening helped us build trust amongst ourselves and ended up paving the way for more fruitful conversations as the course progressed.

VA: What did you take away from the course overall?

TH: Overall, I learned that leadership takes many forms. Every personality is different, but through active listening, anyone can provide leadership in their organization. We all have something different to bring to the table and, if given the tools, we are all capable of stepping into leadership. Through this program, Melissa (our host), provided these tools. Coming back to my organization after finishing the course, I found that I was able to connect and communicate with my colleagues more effectively.


Leader as Coach is designed for the nonprofit sector. Continuous learning and development supports positive change in ourselves and our work. Implementing change in our lives, work, and organizations can be challenging, so we get excited about opportunities that build in time to have practical hands-on experience and provide transformative leadership learning! Tim would recommend this course for anyone who is looking for personal or professional development related to leadership.

Do you want to sign up for Leader as Coach? Register to participate in the fall session beginning in October. This program is offered in both Calgary and Edmonton. Find out more about this program on the Casey Executive Coaching website.

Woman in thought

Five reasons Leader as Coach might be right for you!

As Program Manager at Volunteer Alberta, I know being a strong leader is essential for my success and that of my team, organization, and Alberta’s nonprofit sector. I am passionate about constantly growing, developing, and learning as a leader; however, it can be challenging to do so in our fast-paced sector. Nonprofits are dynamic, demanding, and constantly evolving. There is a lot to keep up with, and finding time and resources for learning is no easy task.

So when I was offered the opportunity to sign up for the Casey Executive Coaching Leader as Coach Program, I made sure to jump and grab it! In a unique partnership, Volunteer Alberta was given a spot in the program at a reduced cost in exchange for sharing the program with others.

There are so many leadership programs out there, which adds another layer of complexity to seeking out leadership learning opportunities. So why did we choose to participate in and promote this one?


Five reasons why I signed up for Leader as Coach

1. It’s tailored for the nonprofit sector

There are many great learning options out there for leadership, but, while the nonprofit sector shares similarities with private and public sector, we are not the same. Acknowledging and addressing our unique differences is integral for succeeding as a leader in our field.

Leader as Coach is designed for the nonprofit sector. All the discussions, activities, and lessons keep a nonprofit perspective in mind to ensure participants gain the most out of the course. I also get to learn alongside nonprofit colleagues!

2. It’s about leading as a coach

While Leader as Coach is great for managers, it also recognizes that anyone can be a leader regardless of their official title. This course would benefit anyone in the sector who wants to be an inclusive leader, develop practical coaching skills, and act as a catalyst for positive change and development in their organization.

The leader-as-coach approach centers on helping your whole team meet their highest potential by developing your skill as a coach. The coach approach includes active listening, thought-provoking questions, and examination of barriers and stuck-points. As a result, there are significant benefits to leader-as-coach approach such as increased staff productivity, engagement, and even retention.

3. It’s affordable

In the nonprofit sector, we understand the value and impact of a dollar. So, it is important to get all the value we can out of any professional development opportunity. And with this course, you do!

Leader as Coach is a three-session course with three additional one-on-one coaching sessions, and, with Canada-Alberta Job Grant funding, the course only costs $500.

4. It’s personal

Melissa Casey, the facilitator of Leader as Coach, is engaging, supportive, and insightful – all the amazing qualities you want in a mentor or coach. She works hard to meet her participants where they are at, and get to where they want and need to be. I left our one-on-one conversation feeling enlightened, energized, understood, and supported!

5. It’s more than a single session

If I learned anything from my four-year bachelor’s degree, it is that it takes time for information to really sink in. The challenge with one-day sessions is that, although we walk away with lots of great knowledge, once we get back to the workplace it is easy to lose sight of what we learned and how to implement it. Taking time to think, explore, and practice helps get the most meaning and value out of a learning opportunity.

Leader as Coach includes three full-day sessions, and three one-hour personal coaching sessions spread over several weeks. The pacing of the course allows for a lot of time for participants to reflect, implement, and evaluate what they learn. Spread out sessions also fit better with busy nonprofit schedules.


Want to sign up for Leader as Coach too? Register to participate in the spring session starting in April in both Edmonton and Calgary. Find out more about this program on the Casey Executive Coaching website.

Vada Antonakis
Volunteer Alberta

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Volunteer Screening: The Best Fit Makes a Big Difference

Volunteer Alberta, along with the Government of Alberta, recently launched our Volunteer Screening Program, which includes education, resources, and funding to enhance Alberta nonprofits’ screening policies and procedures.

In this post, Jennifer shares the impact great volunteer screening has had for her family:


I am a mom of two wonderful kids. A teenage boy and an almost teenage girl. Both are very busy with extra-curricular activities and I am always aware of my children’s safety. From car seats to coaches, I have always wanted the best for my kids.

My son plays hockey, along with many other sports, but hockey is his favourite. Although hockey is not Canada’s official sport, in our family, we like to think of it as Canada’s favourite sport. It’s part of our collective DNA. Year after year, I trust the hockey association he plays for will do their due diligence when they are selecting coaching staff for our team.

Every volunteer coach my son has had is excited to share their passion for the game with the children, in every sport he plays. And really, what better way to do so than coaching! As a hockey mom, I am grateful there are so many wonderful parents (mostly dad’s) who are willing and able to make time in their busy lives to support our team by volunteering to be on the bench and in the dressing room.

I know before coaches enter the dressing room or take their spot on the players’ bench, the organization we belong to ensures a few boxes on the screening list have been checked off. When I look at the 10-step to Screening, I am proud to say the hockey association follows many of the 10-step:

  • The hockey association has volunteer screening policies clearly written and posted on their website.
  • Although they don’t have volunteer descriptions for their coaching staff, I feel that hockey coach doesn’t require too much of a description.
  • Coaches have to submit their application if they are interested in coaching.
  • Successful volunteer coach applicants complete the Respect In Sport Coaches Course, and complete a police check application form which the organization submits on their behalf.

Joining a hockey team, or any sport for that matter, gives our children so much more than the rules of the game. It gives them a chance to be a part of a team, learn to win together, and learn to lose with grace. It teaches them commitment, dedication, discipline, and respect. Sports give them life-long friends, and a place to go whether it’s the gym, the ice, or the field. Volunteer coaches, our coaches, provide the guidance our players need both on and off the ice.

Our players deserve coaches who are passionate and knowledgeable about hockey, but we also look for coaches who will graciously lead their team, modelling good sportsmanship on the bench for both wins and losses. Volunteer Screening allows for our sports organizations to ensure they right volunteers are involved in molding our children into good athletes and good sports!

Jennifer Esler
Volunteer Alberta

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Sunset wheat

Supporting Innovation in Rural Alberta

Last year, Volunteer Alberta’s Managing Director, Annand Ollivierre, started a new, additional role as Journeyman Partner at Alberta Social Innovation Connect (ABSI Connect). The inaugural role was created as part of a new project which engages champions working full-time in Alberta organizations.

Bringing together the work of Volunteer Alberta and ABSI Connect, Annand is working to reveal, engage, and support the social innovation capacity in Alberta with a unique focus on rural communities.

In this blog post, originally posted on ABSI Connect on December 15, 2016, Annand shares how he developed an interest in supporting rural communities in exploring new, innovative possibilities and his hopes for his new role:


In my early years at Volunteer Alberta (I’ve been here for over 5 years now), I spent part of my time presenting on volunteerism statistics. I would speak to nonprofit sector leaders about the volunteerism rates by age and demographic and the reasons why people volunteer and why they don’t. The whole purpose was to provide people with information that challenges assumptions and inspires new actions.

After one of these presentations, in a smaller rural community, a couple of participants approached me, thanked me and then proceeded to let me know that as valuable as the presentation was, they did not see how the information applied to their experience or how it was going to help them.

These community members were worried because it had become increasingly difficult to engage their neighbours, especially in volunteer opportunities. From their perspective, youth and young families were not volunteering, traditional institutions were losing funding, the volunteer base in the community was aging, and no matter what strategies these community members applied, nothing changed.

I empathized with their challenges, but, at the time, I did not have anything of value to offer them that would make a difference.

I returned to the office confused and concerned. I was confused as to why we were presenting information to communities that seemed to make no difference in reality and I was concerned that communities were asking for something that I did not have.  It was at that moment that I started on a journey to explore and unearth the root causes of volunteerism and engagement challenges facing rural communities. This has lead me down a number of paths and shaped a lot of my work over the years — and it continues to shape me.

One of the things I’ve learned is that there are limiting mindsets/paradigms/ways of thinking that pull the levers of what is possible in community. They are often hidden from our view, in the back of our minds and hearts, yet inform us all at the same time. It is often called ‘the status quo,’ but is more accurately the operating assumptions we don’t think to challenge; the established way that doesn’t have to be the only way.

Where communities are stuck or struggling, our operating assumptions are often an unchallenged stumbling block to change.  I’ve learned that there are effective approaches to disrupt and disconnect from our set mindsets and that transforming community with new perspectives and mindsets can make all the difference.

I am excited to be joining ABSI Connect as the first Journeyman Partner. I am privileged to be embarking on an adventure to surface, advance and grow the Alberta social innovation ecosystem by bringing in the perspective of rural Alberta.

I will be connecting with community and organizational leaders from Alberta’s diverse communities who are challenging, reshaping and transforming their communities. There are leaders throughout Alberta who are champions for mindsets and actions that are renewing and transforming communities. By illuminating the ways Albertans are addressing the complex challenges faced by rural communities, I hope to uncover unique patterns and approaches to amplify, expand our collective perspective on social innovation in the province and intentionally connect leaders across the province.

I look forward to meeting you!

Annand Ollivierre
ABSI Connect and Volunteer Alberta

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Nonprofit Experiences: 5 Ways I Support Nonprofits

The nonprofit sector plays a pivotal role in our lives and communities, and impacts all of us in many facets of our lives.

Our interactions with the nonprofit sector are varied: we may work or volunteer for causes we care about, or donate to our favourite organizations. We are also personally impacted through school, religion, community, sports, recreation, and other supportive endeavors. Often, our nonprofit experiences are transformative.

Like everyone, Volunteer Alberta’s staff are deeply connected to the sector as volunteers, supporters, clients, and community members. We have started a series to share the personal impact nonprofits have had on us. Sam shared five of her personal experiences with the nonprofit sector and Cindy shared five key moments in her life as she has engaged with nonprofits and become the volunteer she is today.

Appeal to Future Supporters

Next is Daniela with five reasons she supports local nonprofit organizations. Looking for new ways to appeal to future supporters? Consider appealing to these motivations:

1. Expand my skill sets.

When I was in university, I volunteered with the University of Alberta’s Biological Anthropology lab. It was a great way to meet like-minded people who shared my passion for human history. I gained practical experience and learned about laboratory procedures and the human body.

Organs

Although I don’t use the majority of these skills in my daily work, they have had lasting impacts, for example:

  • I have fun stories for the lunchroom
  • I’m great at removing all kinds of stains
  • I will never get the smell of formaldehyde out of my nose
  • I’m available as a teammate for any obscure trivia team.

2. Broaden my cultural horizons and learn about the history.

My family has always been a big supporter of culture and history. Every summer we traveled around Alberta, visiting small community museums and festivals. These trips are some of my favourite memories! They were adventures, awesome family time, and a fun way to visit our amazing province. It doesn’t matter how often you visit, you can always find something new and exciting and learn something along the way!

My top five favourite cultural attractions (which happen to be nonprofits) are:

Supporting these amazing spots is as easy as visiting them or volunteering with them!

3. Grow the causes I am passionate about.

Through advocacy and donating, I am able to give back to people in my life and support organizations with a worthy cause. Every one of us has been touched by illness – our own or someone we love. Following the diagnosis of a friend, I continue to support the work of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada through financial donations and awareness.

The MS Society of Canada provides support to those with MS and their families, education about the disease, and funds research to find a cure. Together, we can be the cure!

4. It’s a great way to give back to the community.

GiftI LOVE BOOKS! Local libraries are a great place to meet people, enjoy a coffee, attend great programs, and borrow books. One of my favourite places to volunteer is the Edmonton Public Library’s Christmas Gift Wrap. It’s a great way to raise money for library programs and to support literacy in our community. Also, I love seeing all the awesome gifts people get one another for Christmas (Hello, inspiration)!

5. It has expanded my family (many times over).

The Edmonton Humane Society does great work – supporting animals who need shelter, providing them with medical care, and matching them to their fur-ever home. We adopted our dog, Bear (who I hope is enjoying the rainbow bridge), and our cat, Galileo, from the Edmonton Humane Society and they have added so much to our home and our life.

Thank you Edmonton Humane Society , for providing a safe haven for our fur babies and giving them all the love in the world before entrusting them to our care! We’ll be back for a dog in the near future!


Stay tuned for more Volunteer Alberta staff experiences with amazing nonprofit organizations, and please share your own experiences in the comment section!

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